A case in which relations give characters multiple values of the same kind.

We have already seen that we can give things value properties – a lamp has a brightness, for instance. Relations give us additional flexibility: since we may relate various things to various values, it is possible to describe a thing as having more than one value at the same time.

To demonstrate:

"Meet Market" by "K M and Eric Rossing"
Feature is a kind of value. The features are snub-nosed, gangly, comely, bright-eyed, and sulky.
Appearance relates various persons to various features. The verb to appear means the appearance relation.
Meet Market is a room.
Bob, Carol, Ted, and Alice are people in the Meet Market.
Bob appears snub-nosed and gangly.
Ted appears sulky and snub-nosed.
Carol appears comely and bright-eyed.
Alice appears bright-eyed and comely.
Yourself appears sulky and gangly.
Instead of looking:
   say "The snub-nosed ones: [list of people who appear snub-nosed][line break]";
   say "The gangly ones: [list of people who appear gangly][line break]";
   say "The comely ones: [list of people who appear comely][line break]";
   say "The bright-eyed ones: [list of people who appear bright-eyed][line break]";
   say "The sulky ones: [list of people who appear sulky][paragraph break]".
Test me with "look".
Test me with "look".
The snub-nosed ones: Bob and Ted
The gangly ones: yourself and Bob
The comely ones: Carol and Alice
The bright-eyed ones: Carol and Alice
The sulky ones: yourself and Ted

>(Testing.)

>[1] look
The snub-nosed ones: Bob and Ted
The gangly ones: yourself and Bob
The comely ones: Carol and Alice
The bright-eyed ones: Carol and Alice
The sulky ones: yourself and Ted

The same logic might be used to provide characters who have complex mood states: a person might be angry and sad, not merely one or the other – feelings being what they are.