Fifty Ways to Leave Your Larva

Example 71

Using text substitution to make characters reply differently under the same circumstances.

We can use these substitutions to put together fairly complicated variations within a single piece of text:

"Fifty Ways to Leave Your Larva"
The Beekeeper's Palace is a room. Wasp is a woman in the palace. Drone is a man in the palace.
Instead of kissing someone:
   say "'[denial], [insult]! [boast]!'";

In this context, [denial] is understood to refer to the denial property of the noun – but we could spell it out with "denial of the noun" if we wanted to.

A person has some text called denial. The denial of a person is usually "Stand back". The denial of Drone is "You forget yourself"
A person has some text called insult. The insult of a person is usually "Grasshopper". The insult of Wasp is "Larva".
A person has some text called boast. The boast of a person is usually "I am ferocious". The boast of Drone is "I have ferocious allies".

And then it would be trivial to insert further rules using these responses:

Instead of attacking someone:
   say "'Get away, [insult]!'"
Test me with "kiss wasp / hit wasp / hit drone / kiss drone".
Test me with "kiss wasp / hit wasp / hit drone / kiss drone".
Beekeeper's Palace
You can see Wasp and Drone here.

>(Testing.)

>[1] kiss wasp
"Stand back, Larva! I am ferocious!"

>[2] hit wasp
"Get away, Larva!"

>[3] hit drone
"Get away, Grasshopper!"

>[4] kiss drone
"You forget yourself, Grasshopper! I have ferocious allies!"